How to Start a Small Barbeque Business

Barbequing is your favored hobby, and because you have unique skills, you find yourself doing more of it. Besides your barbeque is delicious and everyone who has tasted it keeps coming back for more.

But, have you thought about making money from it by launching a small barbeque business? If you want to start with a strong footing, you have to plan thoroughly so your business will profit. If you’re ready, here are some tips and steps that will help you achieve success. 

Firstly, you have to study public places and come up with the right location for your business. Barbeque by character provides several options for presenting food to people. For instance, you can open a storefront barbeque joint and other multiple centers. Here are some additional venues good for the barbeque business:

  • At a beer festival in a food truck or full-sized trailer.
  • In a park, vacant lot or open space with a portable grill and pop up tent.
  • At a sports event, carnivals, fairs, parades out of a full-sized trailer or food truck.
  • Catering at a private party including birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, graduations, or a public function.

Your plan, including cost, staffing, equipment type, and operating procedure, will differ depending on where and how you decide to offer your barbeque. Use the following tips to open your business.

1.  Write a Business Plan

A business plan guides you until your business gains solid footing. Identify your business model and tailor it to your proposed location and how you want to deliver your service.  Also examine financial and legal costs of the business.

The magnitude of your outfit will define the initial cost of starting up. For instance, if you are projecting to work on a vacant spot in your neighborhood or weekends in a drive-thru, you will do well with a portable grill/smoker, simple packaging, and maybe one person to help out.

But if you want to serve lots of people simultaneously in a festival or parade, a trailer or food truck will be essential to service more capacity. Make your business plan with precise details. 

Some essential areas include:

  • Operational cost- an estimated budget for supplies, equipment, ingredients, transport. (that suits the scale of your proposed business)
  • Possible financing alternatives for your startup fund.
  • Possible menu details, including nibbles and side dishes.
  • Your venue preferences and related permit and rental charges
  • Cost of obtaining licenses and food service requirements.
  • Your staffing needs
  • Proposed marketing strategy

2.  Buy the Equipment, Provisions, and Supplies for Your Business

Equipment is an indispensable part of a barbecue business. A list of equipment will include grills, smokers, refrigerators, cutlery, serving utensils, and additional tools.

For your pick of smoker or grill, the type and size will depend on your operation scale. For someone who wants to start in a small space like a drive-thru, all you need is one reasonably priced portable grill. Consider purchasing a grill from a top selling brand like Weber because they have price categories that will fit into any budget. Also the taste of charcoal can’t be beat with their smokers and grills.

However, if you’re going large scale with service to more people in a park, festival, or event, you will need a food truck or van. Moreover, make sure you compare prices and select items that fit your budget. Also, be open to making adjustments to your plan.

3.  Get Licenses and Permits

To run a food business, you need to register with your state and get an identification number from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Besides, certain states do not permit people to trade food commodities prepared in a residential/home kitchen, so verify regulations in your business area.

Look at your county and state government laws regarding food serving and licensing obligations before you start grilling. Furthermore, food operators require some food-handling safety training and certification. Also, consider business insurance to shield you financially.

4.  Employ Friendly Staff

Regardless of your business scale, you can’t do everything by yourself. You’ll need to hire extra help, especially in the food business, perhaps to serve food, run errands, take orders, and grill food. Your staff must be motivated, friendly, and have interpersonal skills.

Profiting from a food business depends partly on the customer’s experience with the service and taste, so incorporate excellent customer service with everything you do. A satisfied customer will tell others and help you grow your business.

5.  Market and Publicize Your BBQ Business

After you’ve retained a spot, acquired equipment and about to go operational, advertise your business on different platforms, including fliers, leaflets, social media, local papers. Also, make an eye-catching banner or poster for your storefront. 

An additional tactic is to present specials from the finest items on your barbecue menu. Also, give out freebies and discounts on your opening day and subsequently. It draws more customers towards your business. Also, give out discount coupons to get them coming back.

In conclusion, don’t procrastinate about starting your barbecue venture after you have all you need.  Also, don’t let the anxiety, fear, or doubt cripple your ambition. Grilled foods are popular now, and everyone wants a piece. Start your barbeque business and fulfill your dreams.